In early August, Chris Morrison announced his resignation as RCO Executive Director. It is with great sadness we see him go. Join us in wishing him well in his exciting future endeavors.

Chris worked in many capacities during his 25-year career with the RCO, always giving his very best to the organization. Whether in his pre-concert talks or his always illuminating program notes, Chris’s deep passion for music as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of all things classical shines through and inspires audiences and colleagues alike.

Chris is a natural mentor and teacher, ready and willing to share his experience and insight with anyone wanting to learn. He led the RCO in the best possible way – by his own example. The organization is stronger today for his efforts.

His colleagues will greatly miss his presence in the office. It has been a wonderful opportunity working with Chris. His intelligence, his talent, his quiet but wry sense of humor, all helped make the RCO office a place where people want to work. Chris made everyone associated with the RCO feel they all contributed in a meaningful way to its success. He felt that any such success should be shared by all, and we thank him for that.

The organization has conducted a search for, and will announce, a new Executive Director shortly. Everyone here is looking forward to the upcoming concert season, as well as the Nevada Chamber Music Festival in December. Chris played a vital role in shaping both. He also helped initiate the ongoing search for a new Music Director that will culminate in 2020. Please join us in thanking Chris for his many years of service to the RCO, and for his contribution to making it the incredible institution it is today.

Learn more about Chris’s contributions to the RCO and the Reno arts community in a piece written by previous RCO Executive Director, Scott Faulkner, that was published in the RenoGazette Journal in 2014: RGJ Column 10 February 2014—Chris Morrison by Scott Faulkner

In early August, Chris Morrison announced his resignation as RCO Executive Director. It is with great sadness we see him go. Join us in wishing him well in his exciting future endeavors. Chris worked in many capacities during his 25-year career with the RCO, always giving his very best to the organization. Whether in his… Read More


Program Notes By Chris Morrison Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Born: January 27, 1756, Salzburg, Austria Died: December 5, 1791, Vienna, Austria No reminder is really needed of the unique stature of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in the history of Western music. His vast catalog of compositions – over 600 of them, including some 15 operas, 17 masses,… Read More


Program Notes by Chris Morrison Franz Schubert Born: January 31, 1797, Vienna, Austria Died: November 19, 1828, Vienna, Austria Franz Schubert is one of the best-loved and most important composers of the nineteenth century, his music consistently marked by a remarkable melodic gift, rich harmonies, and an expansive treatment of traditional forms. During his short… Read More


Program Notes by Chris Morrison Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber Born: Aug 12, 1644, Wartenberg, Bohemia (Czech Republic) Died: May 3, 1704, Salzburg, Austria Born in a small town in what is now the Czech Republic, Biber played in the orchestra of the Bishop of Olmütz, Prince Karl II Liechtenstein-Kastelkorn, for many years. He left that… Read More


Program Notes by Chris Morrison Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Born: January 27, 1756, Salzburg, Austria Died: December 5, 1791, Vienna, Austria No reminder is really needed of the unique stature of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in the history of Western music. His vast catalog of compositions – over 600 of them, including some 15 operas, 17 masses,… Read More


Mozart: Piano Quartet in E-flat major, K. 493 (1786, 30 minutes) Mozart wrote the first of his two Piano Quartets (in G minor, K. 478) in late 1785, part of a commission from publisher-composer Franz Anton Hoffmeister. Hoffmeister didn’t much care for the new Quartet, though, thinking it too dark and complex to sell well,… Read More


Prokofiev: Violin Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Op. 94a (1943, 24 minutes) The Violin Sonata No. 2 is an arrangement of Prokofiev’s 1942 Flute Sonata in D, Op. 94. At that point Prokofiev had fled from the war. He first settled in Perm in the Ural Mountains, where a number of Soviet artists found… Read More


Rachmaninov: Trio élégiaque No. 1 in G minor (1892, 15 minutes) Rachmaninov wrote his Trio élégiaque No. 1 in just four days in January 1892 – the nineteen-year-old had just graduated in the piano class at the Moscow Conservatory, and was in the midst of completing the opera Aleko that would be his graduation assignment… Read More


Mendelssohn: Piano Quartet No. 3 in B minor, Op. 3 (1824-25, 32 minutes) Mendelssohn completed this work in January 1825, just before his sixteenth birthday. He dedicated it to Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the famous German literary icon, who was a semi-regular visitor at the Mendelssohn home. This Quartet was a pivotal work for Mendelssohn.… Read More


Strauss: Violin Sonata in E-flat major, Op. 18 (1887, 28 minutes) While orchestral music and opera dominated Strauss’s extensive compositional output, he also produced a number of lovely chamber compositions, especially early in his career. Strauss was a very talented prodigy: at the age of sixteen he was labeled “by far the most striking personality… Read More